VOISes of Fiction: Shuuya Kano

“Hi, I’m Shuuya Kano! I’m the leader of the Mekakushi Dan. Don’t worry, you can be my best friend! Just because I’m the leader doesn’t mean that you’re not allowed to be friends with me! And don’t worry, you’ll be well-protected under my watch. With me, there will be no crazy snakes possessing people and ruining lives, and there will be no need for you to die and leave me! Am I lying? Nope! You think I’d lie to you? Why would I lie to you? You’re my new friend! I don’t like losing friends, so I prefer smiling all the time so you don’t have to worry! I smile all the time! Hey, where are you going? Why are you stepping back? Come on, I’m not gonna hurt you! I’ll even let you hurt me!

OW! [sobbing] Uuuuu…Why’d you do that? That hurt! You don’t understand how I feel! I just want some friends! Don’t hate me…Was I lying? I don’t know! Probably! Uh, hey, don’t run away from me, please! Uuuuu…”

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Charlie Hebdo: From a 15-year-old Writer’s Point of View

Even if there are things that I don’t want to say to or hear from other people, I’ll need to hear and say honest thoughts and reports, even if they’re painful to know about, for the sake of knowing what wrong behavior we should not uphold, for the sake of knowing how we can truly form strong friendships with other people, and ultimately, for the sake of finding true happiness. True happiness can’t be found in hating and disrespecting other people, and true happiness can’t be found in lies as well.

You may have published annoying things, but I praise you for being honest, Charlie Hebdo. #JeSuisCharlie.

Corine Tan

"Journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed: everything else is public relations." - George Orwell

I walked into my English class Wednesday morning and saw this written on the whiteboard. Our teacher asked the class, “How many of you have heard about the news in Paris? About the Charlie Hebdo shootings?”

Until then I hadn’t. The explanation that followed stunned me. Two gunmen shot down 12 French cartoonists that were part of satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo. They were attending a meeting when the massacre began. Twelve people died because someone didn’t like their drawings. An act of terrorism against not only the country, but freedom of speech.

Naturally, we discussed the subject in class. We talked about freedom of speech, about the right to publish, and that freedom of press includes the freedom to publish offensive content. It was horrifying to think that someone’s art could lead to such a…

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