Pro-Life Motherhood: A Feminist Career Choice

I know I’ve read this before, but I don’t know why I haven’t reblogged it before! Anyway, God keep on blessing you, Mrs. Juneau, for you are among those who helped me appreciate housewives better!

joy of nine9

Raising children is not a default chore for women who were not successful in the world of business, power, and wealth.  However, the trend in the last few decades has been to delegate childcare to women who are often treated like second-class citizens. Society seems to dismiss and even ridicule women’s most sacred, natural role as nurturing mothers.

I fully realize most mothers have no choice but to work in our present economy. My contention is with prevailing attitudes about children, mothers and child care. From preschool, we are groomed to get ahead, surpass our peers by getting into the best universities and snatch prized careers. But success alone will not make us happy. Just take a look at the generations who have gone before us. The all-too-common mid-life crisis is a testament to the failure of a life focused on career advancement to the exclusion of family. Many women bemoan…

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Some cheese with your ‘whine’: Pope ‘establishes’ complaint-free zone

There are problems, yeah, but there are solutions as well. It’s something that even I myself forgot today, too, hahaha…Anyway, thank God very much for the lessons, indeed… ^_^

CNS Blog

Screen Shot 2017-07-14 at 2.11.48 PM A sign posted outside the door of Pope Francis’ office in the Domus Sanctae Marthae that reads “No whining” (Photo courtesy Vatican Insider/La Stampa)

By Junno Arocho Esteves
Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Francis left a not-so-subtle message outside his office in the Domus Sanctae Marthae residence: anyone who is thinking of making a fuss, leave your whining at the door.

Italian journalist Andrea Tornielli published a photo on Vatican Insider of a sign posted on the pope’s door with the words, “No whining.”

The sign warns potential complainers that “offenders are subject to a victim mentality” that decreases one’s sense of humor and ability to solve problems.

“The penalty is doubled if the violation takes place in the presence of children. To get the best out of yourself, concentrate on your potential and not on your limitations. Stop complaining and take steps to improve your life,”…

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Why Most of Us Are Scapegoats, Not Saintly Martyrs

This just reminded of how much of an oversensitive worrywart I was back then. That, and that one “Pasan Ang Mundo” award that I got during my last year of high school. I find that funny now, yo.

joy of nine9

Every society, every culture has a tradition of a scapegoat: a person or group of people to blame and punish for the sins of that particular society. Centuries ago, old women were blamed for poor crops, cows which failed to produce milk and any birth defects. Less superstitious societies turned on each new group of immigrants to blame for their economic woes and rising crime rates. And, in the beginning of the spiritual life when we are confronted with our own sinfulness and those around us, we also tend to act just like scapegoats. Even if we live a devout, disciplined, ascetic lifestyle with a daily round of Mass, rosaries, Eucharistic Adoration and frequent confession, most of us still fall into this scapegoat trap as we try to become devoted disciples of Jesus.

Suffering For Our Own Sins

When we suffer in isolation for our own failings or act like…

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Danganronpa and Divorcing Hope from Theology

A dear friend of mine wrote a freaking worthwhile article about a favorite video game of mine, yo! \(^o^)

Medieval Otaku

Below is a link to a post on Beneath the Tangles I wrote on hope, Danganronpa, and the imagination.  It might be a little academic, but I hope that my dear readers enjoy it.

Danganronpa and Divorcing Hope from Theology

Dan 1

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Hidden Apostasy

Now this gets me thinking about how I’ve been living lately, alright.

Littlemore Tracts

Great Sin of our Day –

In our contemporary culture, we can see the great evil of what Pope Benedict referred to as the dictatorship of relativism. Not only is every culture seen as purely relative in terms of its particular cultural values and cultural expressions as compared with the values and cultural expressions of every other culture, but good and evil as such has become purely relative, if not at times quite interchangeable. What is good for some people is evil for others, not just subjectively but objectively. Isaiah the Prophet long ago condemned this kind of religious and cultural degradation: “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness.” One important hallmark of this modern cultural and moral relativism, I believe, is the readiness of intelligent people to easily excuse Christian apostasy and to do so by using…

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Beatitudes and Revolution

Here’s something that resonates with me and how I’ve been growing lately, yo.

Littlemore Tracts

4th Sunday of the Year

One of the recurrent challenges posed by non-believers to Christians , or even by believers struggling with their faith is how can one believe in a good creator God when there is so much evil in the world. I can appreciate the depth of this challenge to faith when it is reported that each year there are 45 million abortions worldwide. It is also understandable that even Christians may well question why God does not somehow intervene and put an end to this carnage. Even the Apostles asked Jesus in the boat when a storm came up and he was asleep, “Do you not care that we are perishing!” So anyone can honestly question why God tolerates such massive evils in His creation.

Now the response of the believing Christian when confronted with such massive evil has to begin from two firm beliefs based upon the…

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Christmas Reflection (2016)

Hours ago, I went to Mass with my family. It was a Christmas Eve Mass, and yet again, I felt more at peace at the church. On one hand, it was a strange feeling, as I was born and am living in imperfection. On the other hand, it was a welcome feeling, as a lot of stuff had gotten me believing in God more lately.

And hey, perhaps it’s weird to be a believer in God these days. Why believe in some being that a bunch of people fantasize about, right? Well, speaking of fantasizing, I’ve been thinking about that recently. I’ve been thinking about what makes true faith in God different from blind belief, and now, I think that the difference between the two is that the former focuses on balance, while the latter focuses on extremes.

See, I’ve been observing others and myself when it comes to spreading what we believe in. I see a lot of zeal, something that’s encouraged a lot these days when it comes to living life, I think. Zeal’s good, yes, though sometimes, we go overboard with it, and going out of control isn’t a good thing. And hey, in today’s society, where pluralism and postmodernism are prevalent, zeal is very high on all sides, and people’s hearts blaze for their respective beliefs. I like living zealously, too, and I don’t want to live lazily. Still, I found it strange that the zeal I wanted to have led to unnecessary conflict, and with that, I ended up thinking that living lazily feels much better, though I tended to think of it as something along the lines of “toning it down” most of the time.

I guess I can say that I need to learn a lot more about self-control. I’ve seen my overzealous self and my lazy self in a bunch of people, and in being like those people, I found myself out of my depth. My confidence would crash, and when it goes up, it tends to come with me thinking that self-deprecation is something that can grant me true happiness. My self-deprecation mixes with my overzealousness, and then what follows is a crazier spiral of chaos within me, who’s teetering back and forth, very much unbalanced.

Really, I think I’ve been living my life with the thought that extremes held the key to true happiness. I wanted the true ultimate happiness quickly, and in my rushing, I failed to notice the things I should be watching out for. Then, with that same overzealousness, failure hit me very hard, and then I attempted chilling out to the extreme, leading me towards more stupidity. A cycle of abuse happens again and again, and I fall into further sin the more I hold on to that rushing.

Even now, I wish that this struggle which I found myself stuck in would end quickly. Still, I’ve been realizing that extremes would do me no good. I need to keep myself balanced, looking at things critically and from different perspectives. I need to push down the desire to rush and kick out the desire to laze, because they’ve been hurting me more than I thought. I need other people, but I don’t need to force them, nor do I need to just let them be selfish. My senses aren’t as great as the senses of God, who helped me so many times in my life, and I can’t say that I know everything, nor can I say that I know nothing.

I’m an imperfect human, yes, but I can learn, and I am learning. Fantasizing, which I now consider wishing for extremes, isn’t as impressive as it used to be to me, and now, I want to live in reality, trying to find true happiness within it.

And today, I think I’m really having a merry Christmas. As usual, this world still has conflict, yes, and my future will come with a rocky road, but still, I can see the light…the light of God.

So yeah…Happy Birthday, Jesus. I pray that you continue to show me where the right path is.

And hey, Merry Christmas and more strength to you all as well, dear readers. 🙂

There is only One Absolute Monarch and His Name is Jesus Christ

Thanks be to God.

Littlemore Tracts

The Solemnity of Christ the King 2016

He delivered us from the power of darkness
and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son,.
Col. 1:13

The Solemnity of Christ the King was a beautiful and timely gift to the universal Church from Pope Pius XI in the last century, December 11, 1925. The encyclical Quas Primas in which this great solemnity was established was written only three years into his pontificate, and it was his response to what he said were the “manifold evils in the world [were] due to the fact that the majority of men had thrust Jesus Christ and his holy law out of their lives.” Like his predecessor, Benedict XV, Pius XI was deeply troubled by the aftereffects of World War I in Europe, a growing secularization of society, increasing nationalism and a very hostile anti-clericalism. While there were certainly many causes of this…

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The Final Judgment and Moral Sensibility

Here’s something that got me thinking today.

Littlemore Tracts

33rd Sunday of ordinary time 2016

You will be hated by all because of my name,
but not a hair on your head will be destroyed.
By your perseverance you will secure your lives.”
Lk. 21:19

             As the Church’s liturgical year draws to a close, the liturgy directs out attention to the world to come, to the so-called last things, death, judgment, the reward of Heaven or the punishment of Hell. Today most people in the once Christian West don’t pay much attention to these Gospel accounts of the last things. For a huge number of Westerners, faith is dead, and even nominal Christians no longer believe there really a final judgment. Many others claim they have some kind of faith, but their “faith” does not cause them any concern regarding a divine judgment, since they no longer believe that anyone really goes to Hell.

The universal…

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Penman No. 218: History and Irony

And now, some very interesting thoughts from my favorite UP professor.

Pinoy Penman 3.0

11884866_supreme-court-extends-status-quo-ante-order_e9546b1e_m.jpgPenman for Monday, September 26, 2016

I’D NEVER heard of Ramon Cualoping III and Marco Angelo Cabrera until their names were linked to the recent flap involving the use of no less than the Official Gazette in an apparent effort to sanitize the memory of Ferdinand E. Marcos by removing any reference to martial law—you know, the martial law that Marcos invoked to impose his dictatorial rule on his people from 1972 until he was deposed by a popular revolt in 1986. (Yes, he technically lifted martial law in 1981 but he continued to rule with a rubber-stamp legislature.)

Some Googling revealed that Cualoping was an Ateneo Communication Arts graduate, batch 2004, while Cabrera graduated from San Beda in 2013 and interned briefly with the Department of Foreign Affairs; he had also worked for Sen. Bongbong Marcos. Those are both fine backgrounds for jobs at the Presidential Communications Operations Office—just the…

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